Picture This! Computer Graphics in New Zealand - Gibbons Lectures 2013

20 December 2012

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Computer Graphics concerns the generation and manipulation of images by a computer, often with the assistance of specialized software and hardware. The development of Computer Graphics has made computers easier to interact with, and made them better for assisting us to understand and interpret many types of data. Computer Graphics has had a profound impact on entertainment media - it has revolutionized animation in movies and has led to the video game industry. Nowadays Computer Graphics images have become omnipresent - computer imagery is found in newspapers, on television in weather reports, in GPS devices, and in all kinds of medical investigation and surgical procedures.

Research in the field of Graphics has been of long-term interest for Computer Science in New Zealand. This has been matched by some ground-breaking uses of Computer Graphics in advertising, enhancing sports viewing and, of course, in movies.

In this series of lectures we have presentations that cover a range of topics in the area. As lead speaker for the 2013 Gibbons Lectures we have Professor Geoff Wyvil from the University of Otago whose Graphics research has been fundamental – he will introduce us to the "magic" behind the discipline. At the other extreme, the next speaker, Dr John Lewis of Victoria University will introduce some of latest ideas being implemented at Weta Digital Research. The final pair of lectures, from Auckland University staff, represent two extremes of Graphics application - Professor Gordon Mallinson will discuss the importance of Computer Graphics to the practice of Engineering and Dr Burkhard Wuensche will deal with Computer Graphics in game playing.

All of the lectures will be presented in room OGGB3/260-092 on level 0 of the Owen G Glenn building on Grafton Road. The lectures will commence at 6:30pm, with refreshments being provided in the lobby from 6:00pm.

Note that there is public parking in the basement of the Owen G Glenn building, accessed from Grafton Road.